The anatomy of conversion-driven product pages

Every online seller relies heavily on the effectiveness of product pages. What is the recipe for a conversion-focused killer product page? Read this article and don’t miss out on conversions again! Read more

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Product pages – we all rely on them heavily in our online stores, but how much time do we actually spend on improving them? If you create a simple page template that suits most cases and simply expect a product to sell “itself,” you can easily miss your sales targets and higher conversions. So, what elements should an effective product page contain to truly show off the best digital twin of you product?

Titles

This may sound simplistic, because having a title is something that every product page has, right? If you take a quick look at the leading B2C online stores, you see that product titles are usually meaningful and descriptive of the product. Unfortunately, the situation is not so uplifting for B2B solutions. An ERP platform, which is often the basis for information being fed to an online store, produces low-quality titles. Abbreviations and attributes as part of product names, and inconsistent text cases, such as capital letters, make it harder to understand what kind or product we are dealing with. This can really undermine the customer experience. Let ERP be ERP, but pay attention when creating meaningful product titles in PIM, and use these in customer-facing channels. Implementing a PIM solution will ensure consistent and high-quality product data in all those channels.

It is PIM, not ERP that should be the source of product titles. Let ERP be ERP, but allow PIM to do its job Click To Tweet

Product description

A good story sells, whether this is the product’s background story, where, how, and by whom it was produced, or how it should be used. A good story also consists of moments that allow potential customers to easily understand the advantages of the product. A description that allows the customer to envisage themselves using the product or how their everyday lives can improve from a purchase increases conversion rate, too. Avoid general descriptions written by the supplier – not only are they dull, but their generality is shunned by search engines. Genuine product descriptions always work better than generic ones taken from a common industry database or a supplier. Changing from mere product descriptions to narratives facilitates a stronger relationship with the brand and makes room for boosted conversion and higher margins, too. 

‘The American Felling Axe’ item by Best Made

Specifications and attributes

It is easy to think that attributes and specifications are only height, length, width, or weight. However, these usually do not cover all the questions that customers have in mind. What a product is made of and how it should be used, maintained, and stored are also questions that customers have. Use customer service or store personnel to find out more about what information a customer expects from a product. By covering all the areas that a customer can imagine, the chances of a purchase rise exponentially. If you have products that have multiple technical specifications, consider implementing a comparison tool. We have written more about handling product attributes in ‘How to work with product attributes’ on our blog.

Variants

A product such as sunglasses can come in different sizes, colors, and lenses type. Give the customer clear information that the product is available in other variants, either by pull-down menus or by different input fields to the other variants. In addition, you should explain why the customer should choose one variant above another, especially with regards to features that are not typical to choose (i.e., not size or colors). Look at the example from the American online furniture retailer, Crate and Barrel. They show the size of the sofa, but, if this one is too large, you can try the petite variant.

The relevant landing page is a good example of how you can easily influence your customers’ purchasing decisions and help them find their way to other products that fit their needs better. We have discussed product variants more extensively in ‘The benefits of offering products through variants’ on Bluestone Blog.

Breadcrumb path

Breadcrumbs originated in the tale of Hansel and Gretel, where the two children leave breadcrumbs to find their way back home. Similarly, an e-commerce website visitor can come from a search function and find an interesting product. A breadcrumb path is the small path that is there at the top of the website, usually right below the menu. By clicking on the breadcrumb, you can easily find similar products in the same category, without having to go through the entire category structure. An effective category structure, reflected by the breadcrumbs, originates in PIM, where products are managed through categories. Product pages that focus on user experience also include the breadcrumb path on mobile websites.

Pictures and video

A good product page contains high-quality, informative product images. A solid base for making a sale comes from adding a 360-degree view, close-ups, contextual images, photos from different angle, images of the product in use, and a product video.

Accessories and replacement products

Nothing is more frustrating than buying a product only to find out that you need another product to use it. A good product page tells this to the customer straightaway, without triggering cart abandonment. Examples here include additional or necessary accessories or replacement parts. 

Products that fit together


Some products are typically used with other products. They may be in the same furniture series, such as a table and a cupboard that belong to one line. Clothes online stores are good at this by putting together matching outfits. It is an excellent way to show greater product diversity to customers. The additional product which is displayed doesn’t have to be exactly what a buyer was looking for, but what they also see might seem interesting, too.

Documentation

An effective product page also contains links to all necessary documentation. There may be brochures, user manuals, assembly instructions, FDV, environmental certificates, or the like. Finding a document associated with a product should be easy.

Wishlists

Facilitating a wishlist or a reminder functionality makes it easier for the user to remember the item and purchase it on their next visit. In this way, Add to wishlist can serve as a secondary call to action. If one also receives a message about the item when, for example, its price has been reduced or its availability is changing, then this can be a factor that determines the sale. 

FAQ and chat

Even if a product page contains all the elements above, a customer can still have questions about a product. An intuitive chat can take away the remaining hurdles before making a purchase. If you do not have the opportunity to have a live chat, then questions should be easy to ask via an FAQ. The advantage of the latter is that an FAQ can be made available to other customers with similar queries. You can also provide additional social proof behind a product by implementing a comment section from social media. 

Conclusion

All things considered, product information (descriptions, attributes, media files, etc.) is still the number one feature that customers look for on a website. To meet the ever-growing market requirements regarding product data, each seller can benefit from a dedicated product information management platform. In particular, you should implement PIM to:

  • Protect brand consistency by establishing one source of truth for product content
  • Put in place data quality monitoring
  • Ensure consistent product data

If you are interested in a guided tour of Bluestone PIM, a PIM solution which can help you with all your product information management requirement, you can do it here.

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Posted by Camilla Hetty Osa

Camilla works as a digital advisor in Bluestone. She has close to 20 years of experience with the development of different digital projects. Camilla has worked with many of the largest retailers in Norway and is passionate about developing the best customer experience – in any channel.

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